Here we go, new Ubuntu 18.04 LTS is up and it would be one of better supported versions of Ubuntu in last 2 years. It already have couple of big changes like Gnome after almost 8 years of forcing Unity as main Desktop Environment and also it switched back from Wayland to Xorg (thank God for lot of users which use apps like TeamViewer).

As for somebody who use Windows as his main Operating System on his work and home computers, using Ubuntu is nothing more then easy* switch.
For example: almost all apps that I use for work and college works in some way, shape or form in Ubuntu. Likewise Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator have great alternatives with Gimp and Inkscape, Adobe Premiere Pro and Sony Vegas Pro have good counterparts and also you can use older versions of sotware trough Wine* and PlayOnLinux, Microsoft Office have good alternative with LibreOffice and with college Office365 enabled account Office Web Versions. Those are just alternatives, for instance – Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox and Sublime Text have native Linux applications.

For UI and system optimizations for older* hardware I can say from personal perspective that is great because it detects all drivers on first try even without any additional installation afterall. All drivers are detected OOBE which include graphics driver, WiFi and Bluetooth card and even Gamepad (Xbox 360 Clone Gamepad). It can have some hiccups with some random apps that can slow down machine, but those are really heavy duty apps and usage of older hardware.

I already mentioned apps which can run on Linux with native support, but there I forgot to write about games. Well, for somebody who is lately in older games and retro games from 1990’s and late 1980’s it can run them using few apps like RetroArch and Dosbox. Dosbox is used for old school DOS games and RetroArch is in first glance easy collection of old system emulators. Most of them are now power hungry and it can run titles from NES, SNES and Gameboy. As of PlayStation games I can run it from RetroArch, but for them I found PlayStation default emulation trough it is bit slower then on Windows with easy to use Playstation emulator.

Overall, using Ubuntu is like using any other Operating System for IT guys, but for somebody who is new it can be some pain in butt hole. For newbies I recommend Linux Mint with Cinnamon Desktop Environment.

*Note 1: It is easy, but then need to change some keyboard shortcuts to be more Ubuntu based.
*Note 2: Wine is app that can run Windows dll’s and executable easy and as native to Linux
*Note 3: Older hardware means Intel Celeron N2840 CPU with only 4GB of DDR3 with 5200rpm 60GB hard drive.

Alternative title: Or how to use Ubuntu as main laptop OS

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